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Publications about 'metastasis'
Articles in journal or book chapters
  1. M.A. Al-Radhawi and E.D. Sontag. Analysis of a reduced model of epithelial-mesenchymal fate determination in cancer metastasis as a singularly-perturbed monotone system. 2019. Note: Submitted. Also in arXiv:1910.11311. [PDF] Keyword(s): epithelial-mesenchymal transition, miRNA, singular perturbations, monotone systems, cancer, metastasis, chemical reation networks, systems biology.
    Abstract:
    Metastasis can occur after malignant cells transition from the epithelial phenotype to the mesenchymal phenotype. This transformation allows cells to migrate via the circulatory system and subsequently settle in distant organs after undergoing the reverse transition. The core gene regulatory network controlling these transitions consists of a system made up of coupled SNAIL/miRNA-34 and ZEB1/miRNA-200 subsystems. In this work, we formulate a mathematical model and analyze its long-term behavior. We start by developing a detailed reaction network with 24 state variables. Assuming fast promoter and mRNA kinetics, we then show how to reduce our model to a monotone four-dimensional system. For the reduced system, monotone dynamical systems theory can be used to prove generic convergence to the set of equilibria for all bounded trajectories. The theory does not apply to the full model, which is not monotone, but we briefly discuss results for singularly-perturbed monotone systems that provide a tool to extend convergence results from reduced to full systems, under appropriate time separation assumptions.


  2. L. Liu, G. Duclos, B. Sun, J. Lee, A. Wu, Y. Kam, E.D. Sontag, H.A. Stone, J.C. Sturm, R.A. Gatenby, and R.H. Austin. Minimization of thermodynamic costs in cancer cell invasion. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 110:1686-1691, 2013. [PDF] Keyword(s): chemotaxis, cancer, metastasis.
    Abstract:
    This paper shows that metastatic breast cancer cells cooperatively invade a 3D collagen matrix while following a glucose gradient. The front cell leadership is dynamic, and invading cells act in a cooperative manner by exchanging leaders in the invading front.



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Last modified: Mon Dec 30 13:54:45 2019
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